Thanks to you, they can now have hope

Blossoming Buds, by Kim Hughes of PaperSmooches.net

When our son, Chase, was a toddler, we had nowhere to turn for guidance on how to address his vision disorder… a condition for which we were told there was no cure. Today, 25 years later, there is another little boy named Chase whose parents can rely on The Vision of Children Foundation for support and information. Thanks to you, they can now have hope.  Our knowledge of genetic eye diseases has increased dramatically, and treatments and cures for both of our boys – and for millions of other children – are closer than ever to becoming a reality!

Karline Kozusko, the mother of little Chase recently shared her thoughts with us.

“When we heard that Chase was born with ocular albinism and optic nerve hypoplasia, my husband and I cried for days. We didn’t know where to turn and felt so alone. Now that we’ve discovered Vision of Children, we feel like we have an extended family,” she said. “Thank you for working so hard to find cures for all our babies. My heart is always full of hope for my little guy.”

As we celebrate The Vision of Children’s 25th Anniversary, we are humbled by the extraordinary progress our researchers have made, thanks to ongoing support from you and other donors. When we first started The Vision of Children, we knew there was a vital need to fill. Millions of children are born each year with uncorrectable vision disorders that have a devastating impact on their quality of life. They have inherited rare genetic defects from their mothers or fathers. Those hereditary conditions will continue to be passed on for generations unless cures are discovered.

The Vision of Children Foundation is at the forefront of unlocking the secrets to genetic eye disorders.  Among many breakthroughs, our researchers have isolated genetic mutations and developed genetic tests. With clear pictures of the culprits, they are focusing on remedies using stem cell therapy, genetic reprogramming and medication trials.

One of our most promising research projects is a novel medication that has demonstrated its ability to significantly slow or even halt the progression of myopia (nearsightedness), the most common eye disease in the world. We are halfway to our goal of fully funding research to test this medication’s safety. This vital step will, if successful, enable us to begin clinical trials. We hope you will support this work through a generous year-end gift. Your gift will help develop a groundbreaking medication that could change the lives of millions of children and adults coping with a previously untreatable disease. 

 Chase Kozusko uses the handheld video magnifier  donated by The Vision of Children Foundation.

Chase Kozusko uses the handheld video magnifier  donated by The Vision of Children Foundation.

 Chase Hardage with Jeremy Poincenot,  World Blind Golf Champion, inspirational speaker, and  Vision Hero Ambassador for Vision of Children.

Chase Hardage with Jeremy Poincenot,  World Blind Golf Champion, inspirational speaker, and  Vision Hero Ambassador for Vision of Children.

 Four-year-old Chase Kozusko loves to build intricate  superhero creations with Legos.

Four-year-old Chase Kozusko loves to build intricate  superhero creations with Legos.

 


For a quarter of a century, The Vision of Children has funded research projects like this and others that have broad implications for many hereditary childhood blindness and vision disorders. Thanks to you, we’ve made enormous progress!  

Please help us give big Chase, little Chase and millions of other children around the world the gift of clear sight. You can use the enclosed envelope or make a secure donation online at  www.visionofchildren.org/donate.

Thank you for making your tax-deductible contribution today!
Sincerely,


Sam and Vivian Hardage

Co-Founders

 Song of the Strange Woods, Lauren Mills

Song of the Strange Woods, Lauren Mills


P.S. Donate $500 or more by 12/31/2015 and receive a unique aluminum print of an original  painting by our Vision Hero, Lauren Mills! Lauren, who is 15 years old and legally  blind, has been drawing since she could pick up a crayon at 10 months of age  and began painting when she was 11. She created this work of art just for  The Vision of Children Foundation.